THE HOSPITAL PLAYERS 

Scunthorpe's Oldest Amateur Dramatics Group - Established 1943

 56th Production

 

Alice in Wonderland and Alice Through the Looking Glass

 

By Lewis Carroll

Dramatised by Clemence Dane


Tuesday 8th to Saturday 12th December 1964

Cast


Alice in Wonderland

Alice

White Rabbit

Mouse

Dodo

Lory

Duck

Caterpillar

Father William

Young Man

Frog Footman

Duchess

Cook

Cheshire Cat

March Hare

Mad Hatter

Dormouse

2 of Spades

5 of Spades

7 of Spades

Queen of Hearts

King of Hearts

Executioner

Soldiers

 

Gryphon

Mock Turtle

Knave of Hearts

Loretta Thompson

Anthony Bridgewater

Margaret Williamson

David Elford

Jim Tierney

Clarice Coley

Martin Palmer

Hedley Brown

Margaret Williamson

Joan McPhun

Anne Thomas

Helen Lane

Carolyn Case

Hedley Brown

David Mann

Barbara Swaby

Margaret Williamson

Clarice Coley

Joan Brown

Doreen Sutton

Fred Butler

Bryan Stubbs

Jim Tierney

Martin Palmer

Nigel Shaw

David Elford

Martin Palmer

Alice Through the Looking Glass

Red Queen

Tweedledum

Tweedledee

White Queen

Sheep

Humpty Dumpty

White King

Haigha

Hatta

Lion

Unicorn

White Knight

Phyllis Dadd

David Mann

Hedley Brown

Joan Brown

Joan McPhun

Bryan Stubbs

Nigel Shaw

Hedley Brown

David Mann

Jim Tierney

Martin Palmer

Anthony Bridgewater

Production Team

Director

Stage Manager

Assistant Stage Managers

 

 

 

Lighting

 

Properties

 

Sound

Costumes

 

 

Settings designed by

Licensee and Theatre Manager for the Scunthorpe Corporation

House Manager for The Hospital Players

Pauline Clayton

Ivan Clayton

Sandra Moutrey

Joan Brown

Alan Cressey

David Wilson

Peter Akehurst

Philip Thomas

Doreen Sutton

Barbara Swaby

Anne Thomas

Pauline Clayton

Phyllis Dadd

Barbara Shaw

Ivan Clayton

R. G. Roberts

John Harrop

Programme Notes

‘Alice,’ our second production of the season, has presented the Director, Pauline Clayton, with many difficulties especially in casting and staging. We hope that you will enjoy ‘Alice’ as much of ‘Toad of Toad Hall’ was enjoyed last year.

 

Among the new members taking part in ‘Alice’ we should mention Loretta Thompson who plays the leading part of Alice. We wish her success in her first part for the Players, and hope many other parts will follow.

 

We must thank the Little Theatre Club for the loan of Bryan Stubbs who plays the part of Humpty Dumpty.

 

Our next production is ‘Journey’s End’ by R. C. Sherriff, to be produced by Kay Gardner, the Director of the Lincoln Theatre Company. This year marks the fiftieth anniversary of the outbreak of the Great War and we feel it very fitting to put on the only English play of lasting merit which seems to have emerged from that conflict. Modern opinion may diverge as to the validity of the sentiments expressed in the play but few would deny its force and emotional appeal.

Press Release

'Alice,' or to give the work its rather more portentous Victorian title - 'Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass' - was written originally a century ago by an Oxford lecturer in mathematics. His real name was the Rev. Charles Lutwidge Dodgson but he will ever be remembered as Lewis Carroll.


He wrote 'Alice' for the small daughter of the Dean of his college, Christ Church, and this girl, Alice Liddell, in fact lived until 1934, only a generation ago. Lewis Carroll could never have dreamt that his work would become a classic familiar to practically every child in the English-speaking world.


And not only the English-speaking world, for the book has been translated into many languages and quite recently Walt Disney made it into a film with music.


Not so familiar perhaps is this stage version of the book, which was first performed in London during the war with such famous names as Sybil Thorndike in the cast. Perhaps it can be said that the medium of the cinema allows far more scope than the theatre for the weird technical effects, such as Alice first shrinking and then growing to giant size.


Nevertheless, we feel that the play allows some of the famous 'Alice' characters a great chance to establish themselves with the audience. Take the governessy Red Queen, for example... or the Queen of Hearts and her 'Off with his head.' Take the fussily bureaucratic White Rabbit for instance, or the henpecked King of Hearts or the sardonic Cheshire Cat or the snobbish Humpty Dumpty or those masters of Goon-type dialogue, the Gryphon and the Mock Turtle... but the list is practically endless.


Modern Freudian psychologists have had a field day with 'Alice' of course, but we won't pass judgement on that. We will simply say that if you want to see such famous scenes as the Mad Hatter's Tea Party and the Trial of the Knave of Hearts or such famous characters as Tweedledum and Tweedledee and the Lion and the Unicorn, bring your children to the Scunthorpe Civic Theatre on the following dates.


Tuesday to Saturday, December 8th to 12th at 7.30 p.m. There will also be a special Saturday matinee at 2.30 p.m.